How Exercise Ruined My Body

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I can’t tell you how many times my muscles and joints have sprained, torn, dislocated, stiffened and ached — all in the name of exercise.  Sure, I know many of my injuries are part of the risks of contact sports like wrestling, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai, but many of them weren’t.  Most of them were actually injuries that wrecked my body after routine runs and lifting sessions at the gym. In the past I would take a week or two off, heal up and jump back into training, but I noticed that a couple months down the line, I would fall into the same types of injuries. This is when I realized, there was something seriously wrong with the way I was approaching my health and fitness.

I’ve seen and heard it several times (myself included) where the injured client says “I hurt myself while [XYZ] training and so I’ll have to take a break before I can go back at it.” The problem with this statement is that often times, this is exactly where the train of thought ends. You get injured while training or exercising and that’s life. Rest up, heal up, tough it out and then get back to training. Simple right? Sadly, no. What if instead of that simple injured, rest, heal and back to training formula, people took it a step further and asked “is there something wrong with my training that led to my injury?” Or how about “is the way I’ve learned to exercise and move ruining my body?”

Many people associate their injuries with some uncontrollable bad event that happened with their training, but not many enough associate their injuries with consistent and improper form that has been occurring throughout their training and day to day movements.

Do your knees hurt after long runs? Does your lower back ache after deadlifts and squats? Do you have neck pain after shoulder exercises? All of these issues can be prevented with learning and relearning  proper fundamentals in biomechanics and exercise form.

What to do next?

(1) Think about the last time you had an injury or pain after exercise and reevaluate whether it was caused by a random unfortunate event, or if it could have been prevented with better exercise form and training

(2) Continue reading future movemo posts along better mobility and injury prevention training

(3) Check out Kelly Starrett’s new book, Becoming a Supple Leopard

Tips for the next blog installation on better mobility and injury prevention during exercise: Midline Stabilization

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